Build & Protect April 2019 Edition

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Lightning Protection Institute Inspection Program Announces National Lightning Safety Initiative

“Now you have it. Will it work?” Double Check.

LIBERTYVILLE, Ill., April 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — The Lightning Protection Institute Inspection Program  (“LPI-IP”), announces its national lightning safety initiative, “Double Check.” Check 1. Have a lightning protection system. Check 2. Have the system inspected and certified.

“People say, ‘I have lightning protection. Isn’t that enough?’ when actually, no, it’s not,” said Tim Harger, LPI-IP program manager. “Double Check was developed to ensure property owners understand this.”

The Double Check initiative advocates independent third-party inspection and certification of professionally designed and installed lightning protection systems in residential and commercial settings.

As lightning protection systems gain widespread acceptance as a necessary life safety application, property owners are encouraged to check both boxes.  Demand systems designed and installed by lightning protection professionals. Demand the system be inspected and certified by a nationally accepted third-party. Because lightning protection systems’ performance depends entirely upon the quality of the manufactured components, system design, installation, and suitability, inspection and certification is a must.

The education push about the need for professionally designed, installed, inspected and certified lightning protection comes as the industry takes a pivotal turn to a higher level of professionalism. Building has become almost entirely dependent on “smart” and traditional technology to power structures and the lives and work of their occupants. Insulating those systems from catastrophic interruption is vital. Architects and engineers are increasingly unwilling to merely “check the box” of specifying lightning protection. More and more they demand robust systems that match the complexity and function of the structures they design and build. They prefer certified lightning protection companies and practitioners with capabilities, processes and resources to meet their projects’ needs efficiently.

LPI-IP is in lockstep with its building and design counterparts in advocating the highest professional standard. Independent third-party inspection and certification is the final word on the quality and efficacy of the systems they specify and trust to protect their projects.

Lightning strikes the U.S. 20 million times each year. Annually, lightning-related property losses exceed $2 billion dollars. Between 3 and 5% of all property and casualty claims involve lightning. At approximately less than 1% of the total construction cost of a commercial or residential project, a quality lightning protection system is a prudent, economical life safety, risk management and mitigation investment.

About the Lightning Protection Institute Inspection Program

The benchmark for independent third-party lightning protection system inspection and certification, LPI-IP is the industry’s most comprehensive inspection program. Since 2010, LPI-IP spans the full spectrum of national standards. Its leadership team and inspectors are experts in the discipline, combining to deliver inspection, certification, specification, design consulting and review, interpretation and other services to meet the needs of property owners, architects, engineers, general contractors and homeowners. For more information, visit www.lpi-ip.com.

About the Lightning Protection Institute

The Lightning Protection Institute (LPI) is a not-for-profit, nationwide group founded in 1955 to promote lightning safety, awareness and education and is a leading resource for lightning protection information and system requirements. Visit the LPI website at www.lightning.org for more information.  

For media inquiries, reach Kristen Lunceford at kristen@bellagroupinc.com or 561-308-4741.

SOURCE Lightning Protection Institute

Related Links

https://www.lightning.org

Lightning Protection Systems and Sustainable Design: 5 Reasons for Architects to Design with Lightning in Mind

The benefits of lightning protection are in the forefront of construction with architects making buildings more sustainable, as demonstrated at the Oakland University Human Health Building designed by architects at the SmithGroup. (Photo by Justin Maconochie, courtesty of ECLE)
The benefits of lightning protection are in the forefront of construction with architects making buildings more sustainable, as demonstrated at the Oakland University Human Health Building designed by architects at the SmithGroup. (Photo by Justin Maconochie, courtesy of ECLE)

In Support of Architecture Month

HARTFORD, Conn., April 16, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — According to the American Institute of Architects, sustainability is a key element of the architecture profession’s approach to design in the 21st century. As architects are tackling a myriad of global challenges, including challenges posed by increasingly unstable weather patterns, more architects and planners are taking a “build” and “protect” approach to design and construction.

Since lightning is a weather hazard that affects people, property and places in nearly every region of the U.S., it’s no surprise that lightning protection systems (LPS) have become increasingly important for the building process.

“Lightning protection is a built-in feature designed to protect structures—both old and new—from a very common, yet highly destructive weather event,” said Bud VanSickle, executive director of the Lightning Protection Institute (LPI). “In an era where technology, delivery methods and construction science are evolving at a lightning-fast pace, specifying lightning protection is part of a best-practice risk management approach.”

“Building design can have a profound impact on the economy, so it’s important that architects and designers embrace a broader concept of sustainability,” said Michael Chusid, RA FCSI, an architect specializing in building materials. “By including lightning protection systems in their owner check-lists, architects can deliver a higher level of quality assurance and value-engineering for resilience.”

Architects who haven’t considered lightning protection, may want to consider these five important reasons for including LPS in building designs and plans.

  1. Affordability – Pricing for LPS typically runs less than 1% the value of a structure; hence often less expensive than security systems, generators and specialty lighting.
  2. Safety Requirements – Insurance, OSHA and risk management authorities are increasingly citing lightning protection measures in their hazard mitigation plans.
  3. Fortifies Technology – Automated building systems and smart structures rely on lightning protection to prevent surge interruptions and costly downtime.
  4. Improves Sustainability – LPS is frequently included on Green and LEED structures as a building resilience measure against a common and highly destructive weather threat.  
  5. Hazard Analysis: Lightning protection is increasingly required when a NFPA 780 Risk Assessment determines a structure’s vulnerability to lightning is greater than its tolerable risk.

“Conducting a lightning risk assessment is the architectural standard of care,” explained Chusid. “Architects who fail to use the NFPA procedure may be professionally liable if lightning damages a building they designed,” he warned. 

The Lightning Protection Institute and the Lightning Safety Alliance are honoring Architecture Month by providing architects with free educational resources about lightning protection and national safety standard requirements for LPS.

Build and Protect Resources for Architects

Related video: The Importance of Lightning Protection for Architects and Engineers 
Continuing education: Lightning Protection 101 (LSA101) AIA/CES Registered Program   
Build & Protect newsletter: Winter 2019 Edition  
LPS materials for A&E’s: Build & Protect portal 
LPS inspection and certification: LPI-IP ProgramRolling sphere animation: YouTube

About the Lightning Protection Institute 
The Lightning Protection Institute (LPI) is a not-for-profit, nationwide group founded in 1955 to promote lightning safety, awareness and education and is a leading resource for lightning protection information and system requirements. Visit the LPI website  at www.lightning.org for more information.

About the Lightning Safety Alliance 
The Lightning Safety Alliance (LSA) is a non-profit, national league of lightning protection professionals and consumers dedicated to the promotion of lightning protection and lightning safety. Visit the LSA website at www.lightningsafetyalliance.com for more information.

SOURCE Lightning Safety Alliance

Related Links

http://www.lightningsafetyalliance.com

LPI ANSI Accreditation Survey Notice to Membership: March 11, 2019

LPI NEEDS YOUR HELP!

LPI is working on ANSI accreditation for our certification testing program – Journeyman Installer (JI), Master Installer (MI), and Master Installer Designer (MID).  Industry professionals have joined Ohio State to identify the processes involved with job descriptions common to each of the various levels of certification.  We now need verification from each certified individual through the below survey.  Please complete and submit your surveys within the next couple of weeks to keep the process on schedule.  LPI asks that you also include others with your firm, who may not be certified through LPI, but understand the nature of the certification process.

You will need to allocate 30-60 minutes for the full survey.  We really appreciate your early participation to help LPI improve the quality of our offering with the JI, MI, & MID certifications for our industry!

Here is the link to the survey: https://osu.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_ahgZ6GOSf8XeX7D

If you have any trouble opening, please contact the LPI office for assistance.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Bud VanSickle, LPI Executive Director

Lightning Protection Institute

800-488-6864 / LPI@lightning.org

Workshop Will Review Lightning Protection, Resilient Construction & Blueprints for Collaboration to Help Designers “Build & Protect”

For Immediate Release

Atlanta, GA – February 26, 2019 — Atlanta architects and planners will have an opportunity to learn about lightning protection, resilient building practices and blueprints for collaborative partnerships at the Build & Protect workshop on Wednesday, March 6.

The workshop is part of the Lightning Protection Institute’s (LPI) recent initiative to provide A&E’s with educational resources related to lightning protection system design, specification and quality assurance.

“A single lightning strike can generate up to 200 kA of electrical energy, making lightning protection increasingly important for inclusion in green building and the smart structure design process,” said Bud VanSickle, LPI executive director. “Our Build & Protect workshop will provide invaluable resources to equip architects and designers with relevant content on how to protect their structures from the lightning hazard—even before they are built.”

In addition to lightning protection content, representatives from BASF and +Lab Architects PLLC will moderate education sessions to introduce attendees to design methods, integrated material technologies and partnership synergies for addressing energy and resilient needs through a holistic all-hazards building approach.

“There are new and better ways of designing and constructing a building envelope to improve resiliency,” said Illya Azaroff, AIA founding principal of +Lab and associate professor at CUNY – New York City College of Technology. “Naturally, education is the first step in initiating the shift in thinking and spurring an innovative design process for architects, engineers and builders.”

The workshop, co-sponsored by the Lightning Safety Alliance (LSA) and the CE Academy takes place at the Intercontinental Buckhead Hotel at 3315 Peachtree Road, Atlanta, GA 30326, on March 6 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Registration is free and is online with the CE Academy.

“In order to fulfill the requirements of the Architect’s Standard of Care, it is important for designers to understand how and when to perform lightning risk assessments as well as what steps to take to address these risks for both new and existing structures,” said Jennifer Morgan, educational coordinator for the LSA.

The LSA will present two sessions at the Atlanta workshop to provide designers with an overview of lightning protection and how to assess this common, yet misunderstood risk in the built environment. Workshop attendees can gain four (4) AIA HSW/LU credit hours. The CE Academy will manage reporting of the credits to the AIA and emailing certificates of completion after the event.

About the Lightning Protection Institute
The Lightning Protection Institute (LPI) is a not-for-profit, nationwide group founded in 1955 to promote lightning safety, awareness and education and is a leading resource for lightning protection information and system requirements. Visit the LPI website at http://lightning.org for more information.

About the Lightning Safety Alliance
The Lightning Safety Alliance (LSA) is a non-profit, national league of lightning protection professionals and consumers dedicated to the promotion of lightning protection and lightning safety. Visit the LSA website at http://www.lightningsafetyalliance.org/ for more information.

About the CE Academy

The CE Academy organizes 6 – 8 hours of continuing education in a seminar format for attendees to earn multiple CE Hours in one day. All courses are educational in content and AIA registered. Many courses also offer continuing education hours for GBCI, GBCI for LEED Professionals, ADA (American Disabilities Act), state specific requirements and other specialty hours.

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Build & Protect Newsletter, Winter 2019 Edition

Download newsletter copy with click-through links here: https://conta.cc/2DJow27

Register Today for our FREE Build & Protect Workshop in Atlanta!

Registration is open for our March 6, Lunch & Learn event in Atlanta. This is a FREE continuing education session, so be sure to register TODAY to reserve your space!  

What does “responsibility” look like when evaluating lightning safety and protection protocols for senior care facilities?

As life expectancy standards increase and baby boomers advance in age, the U.S. is swiftly facing a critical challenge to provide appropriate assisted care for seniors. As construction demand for senior care increases, so will the need for these facilities to evaluate safety protocols–including those for building fire safety systems, like lightning protection.

In July of 2017, lightning sparked a fire at the Chesapeake Crossing Senior Community Apartments in Virginia. Now, the family of a woman who died in the fire at the senior living complex has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the management and corporate owner of the buildings. According to news reports, the suit alleges that the apartments and management “negligently failed” to provide proper maintenance for the complex, thus “endangered the lives” of the residents.

An attorney representing the family filing the suit described the complex as housing for “seniors with low income and limited mobility,” and thus alleged that the owner had a “duty” to maintain safe living conditions for its residents.

“That comes with serious responsibility when you’re caring for the elderly,” the attorney explained.

So what does that “responsibility” look like for owners, builders, architects and engineers in terms of the design and build process?

Officials from the senior care facility have stated that the building complex was “in compliance with the building code” and “equipped with smoke detectors and a sprinkler system.” But in terms of achieving serious safety, building code requirements—which typically mandate minimum requirements—often fall short.

According to NFPA sources, fires at senior care facilities are especially challenging and often necessitate more operational protocol and tasks than standard first alarm fire responders can handle. This is a major reason why many fire safety officials upgrade these fires to bring in second or multiple alarm assignments. Since a large percentage of our senior population is incapable of self-evacuating or recognizing a threat, swift response times and appropriate self-rescue tactics are not the expected emergency response for residents at senior facilities.

Detecting fires as soon as they start, keeping them from spreading and vigilance about fire detection, suppression and maintenance are expected safety practices. Unfortunately, many facilities fall short when it comes to implementing measures like lightning protection systems (LPS), which are designed to prevent storm-initiated fires in the first place.

Here’s a look at some of the mayhem that could have been prevented at the Chesapeake Crossing Senior Community Apartments, if lightning protection had been installed on the center’s structures:

Deaths of three residents

·        Deaths of three residents

·        Injuries to six others (including two firefighters)

·        A four-alarm fire, damaging three out of five of the community’s buildings

·        Numerous displaced residents from 144 apartments left uninhabitable

·        A multitude of insurance claims

·        A wrongful death lawsuit, with additional suits expected to follow soon

Assisted living facilities manage an important goal: care and housing for residents who are typically unable to live independently. Residents and their families trust these facilities to evaluate safety and potential risks to occupants, buildings and operations. When considering the potential risk lightning poses to seniors in terms of safety, susceptibility and disruption, shouldn’t the cost (often minimal!) of lightning protection be evaluated as standard protocol for assisted living facilities and housing centers?

Knowing how to react in a fire is especially important for the aging population. As such, the NFPA provides these fire safety tips for older adults.

Lightning Newsmakers of 2018: Striking stories impacting the environment, science, and industry

MARYVILLE, Mo.Dec. 31, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Insights into the nature of lightning and advances in the lightning protection system (LPS) industry are helping to redefine our understanding of the weather hazard and its impact to people, property and places.

New insights into the nature of lightning and advances in the lightning protection system industry are helping to redefine our understanding of the weather hazard and its impact to people, property and places.

Here’s the Lightning Protection Institute’s (LPI) look back at a few striking reports about lightning and lightning protection as shared by scientific, economic and industry experts in 2018:

Lightning “Mapper” Shares Data Previously Unavailable to Forecasters
Last May, the NOAA GOES-17 satellite transmitted its first Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). The revolutionary animation provides insight into thunderstorm formation and activity by sharing data never previously available to forecasters. Scientists say that the GLM helps forecasters anticipate severe weather to help issue appropriate weather alerts sooner. In dry areas of the U.S., information from the GLM may be of special assistance to firefighters in identifying regions prone to wildfires sparked by lightning.

Climate Change Increasing the Risk of Lightning-ignited Fires?
According to a study published in ScienceDaily, the earth could expect to see a 12% increase in lightning activity associated with forecasts of temperature warming. The study claims the U.S. alone, could experience as much as a 50% increase in strikes by the turn of the century. While the findings don’t suggest that lightning increases will occur everywhere, they do predict that increased activity can be expected in many regions—including areas of historically less lightning activity due to overly humid or wet conditions.

Goodness, Gracious, Great Balls of Lightning!
Researchers may have uncovered clues to the mystery behind a phenomenon known as “ball lightning.” Laboratory experiments by scientists at Amherst College in the U.S. and Aalto University in Finland led to the observation of a three-dimensional knot of atoms, called a skyrmion that closely resembles documented accounts of ball lightning. Described as magnetic spins composed of atoms in quantum gas, these skyrmion were first theorized some 40 years ago. According to scientists, future studies of skyrmion could pave the way for advancements in fusion reactors, while also helping to explain the mysterious natural occurrence of ball lightning.

Be Aware, Lightning Happens EVERYWHERE…
While working to spread awareness about lightning safety and increase education about lightning protection, LPI uncovered several new statistics about lightning and its very real fire risk. Unfortunately, most Americans are uninformed about the dangers lightning poses to homes, businesses and communities. To educate people about the underrated fire hazard associated with lightning, LPI compiled a shocking sampling of 2018 media reports in a new infographic.

Inspection Service Meets LPS Industry Needs for Quality Control
Recognizing a need for more stringent emphasis on quality control, the Lightning Protection Institute Inspection Program (LPI-IP), expanded services for third-party lightning protection review and certification. LPI-IP is the only third-party certifying organization that verifies lightning protection system completeness, proper materials and methods, code compliance and notification for future assessments; including needed repairs or maintenance. “Ensuring lightning protection compliance to national safety standards and project specifications is an essential part of quality control for construction managers, property owners and building occupants,” explained Tim Harger, LPI-IP program manager. Quality control and standard compliance may be two important reasons why LPI-IP’s services are increasingly in demand in the marketplace.

Grant Helps Protect African’s Most Vulnerable from Lightning
The Ludwick Family Foundation announced it will provide a $99,000 grant to the African Centres for Lightning and Electromagnetics Network (ACLENET) to install lightning protection systems at Uganda schools and provide education to help African teachers, students and parents better understand lightning’s dangers and prepare themselves against its threat. Dr. Mary Ann Cooper, managing director for ACLENET described a “tremendous” outpouring of support from donors and volunteers assisting with the organization’s mission to protect Africa’s most vulnerable from the deadly lightning threat.

Lightning Included in “Big Weather” Conversation at NDRC
LPI was among presenters from organizations such as FEMA, IBHS, ICC, NOAA, NWS, Smart Home America, State Farm, The Weather Channel and others at the 2018 National Disaster Resilience Conference (NDRC) in Clearwater, FL. Communications director, Kimberly Loehr joined the panel of “Big Practice” experts at the NDRC in November to share a presentation about the growth of LPI’s “Build & Protect” initiative and how lightning protection systems are helping to further community level resilience.

Lightning Zaps Football Fun for Players and Fans
In what may have been the first in the history of sporting events, the First Responder Bowl game was ruled a no contest after lightning forced the cancellation of the football match-up between Boston College and Boise State on December 26. Play in Dallas was halted in the first quarter when lightning activity prompted officials to clear the field. After a 90 minute delay, officials called the game due to weather forecasts calling for persistent thunderstorm activity in the area.

Forecast Calls for Growth in the Global LPS Market
Research released by the global lightning protection system market cites pronounced growth expected for the industry in upcoming years. With lightning protection systems increasingly employed for buildings, homes, medical facilities, military compounds, factories, towers and even the Space Shuttle’s launch pad, the LPS industry is seeing record-breaking growth. And as more buildings are equipped with sensitive electronics and automated “smart” systems, the demand for LPS is likely to continue its increase.

Lightning’s Future File
It doesn’t take a psychic to know that if lightning events become more frequent, the likeliness of being affected by the weather peril that already affects the most people, most of the time, in the most places of the U.S., will also increase. Understanding the lightning threat and preparing people, property and places for the increased risk may be more critical in the future, than ever before.

The Lightning Protection Institute is a not-for-profit nationwide group founded in 1955 to promote lightning safety, awareness and education and is a leading resource for lightning protection information and system requirements. Visit the LPI website at www.lightning.org for more information.

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SOURCE Lightning Protection Institute

Related Links
http://www.lightning.org