Number Of Lightning-Related Homeowners Insurance Claims Up In 2016, But Severity Down

Florida, Texas, Georgia And Louisiana Remain Top States For Lightning Claims; Lightning Safety Awareness Week is June 18 – 24

NEWS PROVIDED BY: Insurance Information Institute NEW YORK, June 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The number of homeowners insurance claims from lightning strikes and electrical surges in the United States rose in 2016, compared with 2015; however, the average cost that insurers paid on those claims fell, according to a new analysis by the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.).

The study, done in partnership with State Farm® found:

  • More than $825 million in lightning claims was paid out last year to more than 100,000 policyholders.
  • Total insured losses caused by lightning rose 4.5 percent from 2015 to 2016, although overall losses have declined 12.4 percent since 2007.
  • There were 109,049 lightning claims in 2016, up 9.7 percent from 2015.
  • Over fifty percent of claims were related to electrical surge damaging components or wiring, while power surges from transformer or service line shorts were also contributing factors. “The average cost per claim dropped 4.7 percent from 2015 to 2016,” said James Lynch, FCAS MAAA, chief actuary at the I.I.I. “However, the overall average cost per claim has risen 42.3 percent since 2007. By comparison,” he noted, “The Consumer Price Index rose only 15.8 percent in the same period.”State by State Numbers
    Florida—the state with the most thunderstorms—remained the top state for lightning claims in 2016, with 10,385, followed by Texas (9,098), Georgia (8,037) and Louisiana (5,956).Homeowners Insurance Coverage
    Damage caused by lightning, such as a fire, is covered by standard homeowners insurance policies. Some policies provide coverage for power surges that are the direct result of a lightning strike, which can cause severe damage to appliances, electronics, computers and equipment, phone systems, electrical fixtures and the electrical foundation of a home.In recognition of Lightning Safety Awareness Week, June 18 – 24, the I.I.I. and the Lightning Protection Institute (LPI) encourage homeowners to install a lightning protection system in their homes.

    “Lightning protection systems that follow the guidelines of NFPA are designed to protect your home by providing a specified path to harness and safely ground the super-charged current of the lightning bolt,” said Kim Loehr, Communications Director for LPI, a national organization that promotes lightning protection education, awareness and safety.

    To locate an LPI-certified lightning protection system installer in your area, click here.

    RELATED LINKS
    Facts and Statistics: Lightning
    Lightning Videos
    Consumer Alert: The Dangers of Shoddy Lightning Protection System Installations
    Infographic:  Got Lightning? Get Grounded

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
    Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety
    NOAA/National Weather Service

    THE I.I.I. IS A NONPROFIT, COMMUNICATIONS ORGANIZATION SUPPORTED BY THE INSURANCE INDUSTRY.

    Insurance Information Institute, 110 William Street, New York, NY 10038; (212) 346-5500; www.iii.org

It’s Lightning Safety Awareness Week! Are you ready for thunderstorm season?

In support of national Lightning Safety Awareness Week, June 18-24, 2017

The NWS and NOAA launched the National Lightning Safety Awareness Week campaign in 2001 to raise awareness about the dangers of lightning, a deadly, yet underrated killer. The Lightning Protection Institute joined the campaign effort in 2007 as partners, to provide messaging about lightning protection for structures, and explain how safety Standard-compliant LPS can make safe places safer. Since the beginning of the campaign, lightning deaths in the U.S. have dramatically dropped. Unfortunately, property and structural losses due to lightning continue to rise.

In support of this year’s LSA Week campaign, June 18-24, LPI is emphasizing the importance of protecting people, property and places. Once again, we are partnering with the National Lightning Safety Council to encourage awareness and share information throughout the week on several topics:

  • Sunday: An Introduction to Lightning and Lightning Safety
  • Monday: The Science of Lightning and Thunder
  • Tuesday: Lightning Safety Outdoors
  • Wednesday: Lightning Safety Indoors
  • Thursday: Lightning Safety and Sports Activities
  • Friday: Medical Effects on Lightning Victims
  • Saturday: Protecting Your Home from Lightning

Help us build lightning safe communities by learning more about lightning’s dangers, and by sharing these important safety and protection resources! Finally, please remember to heed the advice of our pal and lightning safety ambassador, Lion the Lightning Lion: “When thunder roars, go indoors!”

Got Lightning? Get Grounded!

Check out this infographic created by the Insurance Information Institute, in conjunction with LPI, to educate people on the dangers of lightning and how it can enter your home.

LPI and III Lightning Infographic

It’s Electrical Safety Month! Let’s include LIGHTNING in our electrical safety plans and discussions.

Lightning is an underrated and often overlooked electrical fire risk. Lightning protection systems, like the one here, provided by Bonded Lightning Protection Systems, Ltd. can meet building resiliency needs for safety, technology and design.

May is National Electrical Safety Month and each year, LPI supports the Electrical Safety Foundation International’s campaign to raise awareness. While supporting the campaign, LPI also takes the opportunity to remind the public of the dangers of a frequently overlooked and often underrated electrical danger; you guessed it–lightning.

When it comes to electricity, lightning may be the reigning queen, packing a rapid discharge of mega energy that can carry up to 300 million volts and 30,000 amps. That’s a powerful charge, compared to your household electrical current of 120 volts and 15 amps. It’s no surprise that a single lightning strike can kill a human or even an entire herd of cattle in an instant, and destroy an unprotected tree or structure in a flash of light.

Unfortunately, since lightning is the weather peril most frequently experienced by most people, most of the time in the U.S., we often see complacency and apathy about the risk. While NOAA, NWS and the National Lightning Safety Council are leading the way to promote awareness about lightning safety for people, LPI is helping to build lightning safe communities by sharing Build & Protect resources about benefits that safety Standard-compliant lightning protection systems (LPS) can provide for structures and property.

Lightning induced electrical fires can be especially destructive when a strike ignites a structural fire in one of the following ways:

* Through a direct strike

* In an arc discharge between two conductive objects at different induced potentials

* By a current surge in circuitry and electrical equipment

* By the overflow of substantial electrical current which causes overheating, melting or vaporizing of metal

* By arcing of lightning current from conductors at high-resistance grounds

* Through lightning puncturing pinholes in CSST gas piping

Since the key to electrical and fire safety is to prevent hazards before they happen, planning and awareness about personal lightning safety and specification and installation of safety Standard compliant LPS are important elements of a comprehensive electrical safety approach.

National safety Standards for LPS call for practical and tested solutions to protect a structure, its occupants, contents, equipment and operations. A complete system includes: strike termination devices, conductors, ground terminals, interconnecting bonding to minimize side flashing, and surge protection devices for incoming power, data and communication lines to prevent harmful electrical surges. Additional bonding and surge protection devices for vulnerable appliances may be needed, as well. In a nutshell, properly designed and installed LPS is always a total package protection approach.

So let’s play it safe with nature’s electrical risk. While enjoying the May flowers, please take care to head indoors whenever thunder roars. And for prevention-minded folks who want to make their safe places safer, make sure your LPS provider’s materials and methods comply with safety Standard recommendations of NFPA 780.

The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) sponsors National Electrical Safety Month each May to increase public awareness of electrical hazards. For more information about ESFI and electrical safety, visit www.esfi.org.

Lightning Protection Institute Expresses Concerns about a Common Gas Piping

Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing (CSST) Pipes Have Been Linked to Fires, Gas Leaks

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE — MARYVILLE, Mo, April 27, 2017 — The Lightning Protection Institute (LPI) is telling its members to take liability precautions when installing lightning protection systems (LPS) on homes equipped with corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST), a common gas piping.

Lawsuits have alleged that CSST’s thin-walled composition has made it susceptible to fires caused either by lightning strikes or gas leaks linked to perforations in the piping. CSST manufacturers have denied charges that their products are either defective or contributed to property damage which would otherwise not have occurred.

“While safety Standard-compliant lightning protection systems provide proven and effective protection for homeowners against a leading weather threat, continued litigation and unknowns about CSST are a concern for our industry,” said Bud VanSickle, executive director for LPI.

“Unfortunately, the efficacy of these bonding practices hasn’t been verified, so there isn’t data to assure us that these tactics are solving the lightning susceptibility problems associated with the CSST product,” explained VanSickle. “Due to safety unknowns and the continued litigation, LPI is advising its members to disclaim CSST in very clear terms in their work proposals and documents.”

Concerns about CSST have prompted a national public awareness campaign, National Fire Protection Administration (NFPA) reviews, lawsuits and class action settlements.  One was reached recently, for instance, with property owners in Maryland http://www.csstsettlement.com/.

LPI recently began a partnership with the National Association of State Fire Marshals (NASFM) http://www.firemarshals.org/ to help promote awareness and improve safety measures connected with CSST and the product’s susceptibility to lightning. Both groups are supporting efforts within the codes and standards community to increase performance criteria for CSST products.

“Documentation for CSST fire incidents is nonexistent, which makes it impossible to understand and solve the problem,” said Becky Teel, spokesperson for the Brennen Teel Foundation http://www.btfgaslinesafety.org/.  Teel’s son, Brennen, died in 2012 in a Lubbock, Texas, home fire and explosion allegedly caused by the failure of yellow jacketed CSST.

According to the fire marshal’s report, lightning struck the metal chimney cap and arced to the gas piping of the Lubbock home where Mr. Teel was visiting. Brennen Teel, who was 31 years old, was killed when gas which had escaped through tiny holes in the CSST piping—reportedly punctured by the electrical charge produced by a direct lightning strike—ignited an explosive fire.

“We need a central database to catalog the important information about this fire risk, and we need it now,” added Teel.

“Great strides have been made in constructing fire-resistant buildings and improving fire-suppression techniques, both of which have reduced the number of fires in the U.S.  Nonetheless, builders, firefighters and insurers are constantly working to mitigate fire risk wherever it exists,” said Michael Barry, vice president, media relations, Insurance Information Institute.

“The lightning protection industry has taken notice of numerous and mounting CSST-related lawsuits around the country—we’re concerned about protecting homeowners and our members,” said VanSickle. “As a nationwide group dedicated to lightning safety and lightning protection, we will continue to petition the codes and standards community for more improvement and urge the CSST manufacturers to support more research.”

The Lightning Protection Institute (LPI) is a not-for-profit, nationwide group founded in 1955 to promote lightning safety, awareness and education and is a leading resource for lightning protection information and system requirements. Visit the LPI website at www.lightning.org for more information.

###

Contact: Kimberly Loehr LSA/LPI Communications Office kiml@lightning.org 804-314-8955

 

 

Thunderstorms Hit Q1 Record in the U.S.

Will 2017 receive a five-star ⚡⚡⚡⚡⚡rating for lightning losses in the U.S.?

It seems those March winds and April showers may have ushered in more than spring flowers for many property owners across the country. According to new statistics shared by partners at the Insurance Information Institute, U.S. insurance and reinsurance markets have seen record costs from losses due to thunderstorms and convective weather. With $5.7 billion losses cited, the first-quarter of 2017 has seen more than its fair share of stormy skies–and for many parts of the country, it’s not even officially lightning season yet!  In terms of costly weather, you could say that 2017 may be deserving of a “five-lightning bolt” rating.

The good news? While lightning is often a leading threat associated with thunderstorms and tornado conditions, property losses associated with this weather peril can be minimized, if not eliminated through the implementation of safety Standard-compliant lightning protection systems (LPS). This is another reason why LPS has become increasingly important for the building process, as planners and businesses continue to emphasize sustainability and resilience in design and construction. In an era where technology, delivery methods and construction science are evolving at such a lightning-fast pace, specifying LPS is a recognized part of the best practice risk management approach.

Looking to learn more? Architects and Engineers are urged to visit LPI’s A&E portal for important “Build & Protect” materials and information. Property owners may want to visit LPI’s learning center for videos and resources to see how lightning protection systems are helping to reduce structural losses in the U.S.

Join LPI in Orlando for the AIA Conference on Architecture 2017 

aia orlando
The AIA Conference and Expo on Architecture is three-day event where architects exchange innovative information and ideas to shape and transform the future of architecture. From April 27-29, architects from around the world will converge in Orlando, FL to uncover everything that’s new, next and cutting-edge for building products, materials, design methods and technology. Naturally, LPI will participate in the design event of the year to showcase what’s new and noteworthy in the world of lightning protection. Architects, designers and builders are invited to join LPI at AIA Expo booth #1972 to pick-up a free USB flash drive loaded with Build & Protect tools to help A&E’s learn more about LPS and the benefits of incorporating safety Standard-compliant systems into their project designs and plans.

Join LPI in Orlando for three days of fast-paced, hard-hitting ideas, inspiration, education, networking, and innovation from some of the industry-leading architects, firms, and building product manufacturers.

What: Lightning Protection Institute (LPI) Booth #1972 at A’17 
Where: Orange County Convention Center, 9400 International Drive, Orlando, FL 32819
When: April 27-29, 2017
For more information about the AIA conference and Expo, visit https://conferenceonarchitecture.com/

Build & Protect, March 2017

You build it. We help PROTECT it!
 

Recognizing the importance of disaster mitigation for the architect and engineering communities,  Build & Protect , is a newsletter written specifically for A&E’s to provide unique content related to lightning protection system (LPS) design, specification, quality assurance, inspection and maintenance.

Find out how the inclusion of safety Standard-compliant lightning protection systems in your state-of-the-art designs can benefit the building environment.
Featured in this issue:
  • Annual Lightning Protection Conference Review
  • LPI-IP LPS Inspection Program Update 
  • Building Lightning Safe News & Notes from the Community 
  • Closing the Loop to Improve Accuracy in Fire Incident Reporting 
Highlights from the LPI/ULPA Lightning Protection Conference 
Brainstorm creative idea concept or brainstorming symbol as a lightning bolt from the sky shaped as a human head with a lightbulb image as a metaphor to conceptualize and conceive solutions with new innovative bright thinking.
 
Over 100 industry experts from across the U.S. and Canada converged at the Woodlands Resort & Conference Center in Texas last month for educational enrichment, professional development, speaker programs and lightning protection brainstorming sessions.
In the spirit of learning from the past, and protecting for the future, LPI and ULPA members also participated in three separate panel-moderated forums to discuss:
* Job Site Safety for LPS Installations 
* LPS for Miscellaneous (nonstandard) Structures 
* LPS Installation Guidelines and Best Practices for Difficult Structures 
Representatives from the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes-FLASH and the Insurance Information Institute provided partnership updates and outlined strategies for continued networking in 2017. Mike Rimoldi, Senior Vice President of Education and Technical Programs with FLASH reviewed the building code process and delivered an update of the “HurricaneStrong Home” in Breezy Point, New York–a resilient rebuild project that LPI is helping to sponsor.
Jeanne Salvatore, Senior Vice President, Public Affairs and Chief Communications Officer for the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.), provided a partnership overview along with a lightning data and damage statistics report. Information about lightning protection and insurance is available at iii.org and the LPI website.
“Being here with LPI is crucial to what FLASH does to advance lightning protection and safety,” said Rimoldi. “We are very pleased that LPI is committed to the #HurricaneStrong Home– their participation strengthens the connection between industry, LPI members, and promotion of lightning protection in commercial and residential construction.”
Inspection is Key Component to Safe & Effective LPS  
safety_helmet_architect.jpg

It’s important to remember that safe and effective lightning protection begins with proper system design, continues with the implementation of quality materials and installation practices, and ends with inspection and certification.

The Lightning Protection Institute Inspection Program (LPI-IP) provides a lightning protection inspection and certification service more thorough and more complete than any previous inspection program from LPI or any other service currently on the market. By incorporating checkpoints, reviews and inspections, the LPI-IP certification program ensures safety and peace of mind to building owners about the U.S.
The LPI-IP program responds to the designer’s ultimate ‘Build & Protect’ lightning protection goal to provide safety, security of investment and elimination of potential system downtime. The program was created to provide the most comprehensive inspection service for LPS in terms of safety, quality control and professionalism. Checkout LPI’s recent blog to find out why LPI-IP is the industry’s fastest growing lightning protection inspection service, with a 300% growth rate since 2011.
Make sure your LPS project isn’t missing the important inspection component. Visit www.lpi-ip.com for more information about the LPI-IP Program.
Building Lightning Safe 
News & Notes from the Community
Build & Protect Video Reminds Architects to Design with Lightning in Mind 
Are you an architect or designer looking to learn more about lightning protection? If so, you’ll want to checkout LPI’s new Build & Protect video created to acquaint A&E’s with the fundamentals of lightning protection and the benefits of including safety Standard-compliant systems to fortify your building projects.
 
 LPI to Exhibit at AIA Expo in Orlando 
 
The AIA Conference and Expo on Architecture is three-day event where architects exchange innovative information and ideas to shape and transform the future of architecture. From April 27-29, architects from around the world will converge in Orlando, FL to uncover everything that’s new, next and cutting-edge for building products, materials, design methods and technology. Naturally, LPI will be showcasing what’s new and noteworthy in the world of lightning protection.
 


Architects are invited to join LPI at AIA Expo booth #1972 in Orlando next month to pick-up a free USB flash drive loaded with Build & Protect tools to help A&E’s learn more about LPS and the benefits of incorporating safety Standard-compliant systems into their project designs and plans.
Lightning Protection 101 Coming to a City Near You!  


Looking to learn more about LPS Continuing Education in a Lunch and Learn setting? The Lightning Protection Institute is partnering with the Lightning Safety Alliance (LSA) and the CE Academy to bring the Lightning Protection 101 (LSA 101) course to a city near you. The CE Academy has scheduled upcoming LSA 101 sessions in Louisville, Detroit, New Haven, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Orlando, Calgary, Ohio, Jacksonville, Dallas and Austin.
LSA 101 participants receive (1) AIA HSW /LU credit. The one-hour course includes a review of proper lightning protection system design and application as conforming with NFPA and UL lightning protection requirements.
Learning Objectives of the course include:
  1. Participants will gain a general understanding of how lightning protection systems work including the five essential elements of effective lightning protection systems.
  2. At the end of the program participants will be aware of the considerations that should be made during project planning to specify effective, attractive and low-maintenance lightning protection systems for all types of structures.
  3. Provide project planners with a general understanding of lightning protection systems.
  4. Make planners aware of the five (5) essential elements of a lightning protection system.
  5. Identify the areas planners should consider when specifying lightning protection systems.
LSA 101 providers have have extensive knowledge of lightning protection methods and are actively involved in the lightning protection industry and its trade associations. Contact LPI for assistance or visit the Lightning Safety Alliance website to learn more about the course.
Do you have Building Lightning Safe story or perspective to share? Send us your news & notables for inclusion in an upcoming issue of Build & Protect. 
“Closing the Loop” to Prevent Under-reporting of CSST and Lightning Fire Incidents 

In recent years, LPI has petitioned the fire safety community to include relevant data about lightning and corrugated stainless steel (CSST) gas tubing in its NFIRS reports to prevent under-reporting of these associated fire incidents and increase public awareness about potential safety risks. Unlike traditional heavier walled gas pipe, the corrugated design and the thin walls of CSST have proved problematic and susceptible to lightning’s high intensity electric charge. Lightning energies can perforate holes in the CSST and allow gas leakage and fire. In worst case scenarios, such leaks have led to devastating home fires. 

report released by the National Association of State Fire Marshals Fire Research and Education Foundation (NASFM Foundation), in 2014 concurred that “updating incident data reports when fire departments obtain new information  could have the largest impact of any activity on reducing the high percentage of serious fires reported as having undetermined causal data.” The NASFM Foundation refers to this as “closing the loop” on a fire incident report.
In an effort to better protect homeowners from the possible loss  of life and property, the Texas State Fire Marshal’s  Office is conducting a TEXFIRS/NFIRS Special Study to identify fire incidents where flexible gas piping (CSST) was present in a structure. The three-year study will detail fire department responding incidents from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2019.
“Understanding a problem at the state or national level requires documentation to see what’s happening from jurisdiction to jurisdiction,” said Fire Marshal Garett Nelson of the Lubbock Fire Rescue in Texas. “With regard to Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing (CSST), documentation has been virtually non-existent, and we need the documentation to better understand this complex fire problem.”
Brennen Teel was in this garage when he was killed by an explosion produced by the direct lightning strike had punctured five holes in the CSST
Brennen Teel was visiting friends in their brand new Lubbock, Texas home when he was killed in a tragic fire. The homeowner, along with Teel, attempted to turn off a burglar alarm (triggered by a lightning strike), when the gas explosion occurred in the garage.

Photo courtesy of the Brennen Teel Foundation
“In our quest to gather facts about the safety issues connected with CSST, it has become apparent that a central database to collectively house and catalog this important information is an immediate necessity,” stressed Becky Teel, spokesperson for the Brennen Teel Foundation . Teel’s son, Brennen died in 2012 in a Lubbock home fire and explosion allegedly caused by the failure of yellow jacketed CSST. According to the fire marshal’s report, lightning struck the metal chimney cap and arced to the gas piping of the home where Brennen was visiting. Brennen, who was just 31 years old, died instantly when gas which had escaped tiny holes in the CSST piping (believed to be punctured by lightning), ignited an explosive fire.
LPI recently began a partnership with the NASFM to support its campaign to help improve safety measures connected with CSST and the product’s susceptibility to lightning-related fires. LPI, NASFM and the Brennen Teel Foundation  believe that safety can be increased through the adoption of an improved performance criteria for flexible gas piping (ICC-ES PMG LC1027), which is presently available for installation in new homes.
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There’s a saying that goes, “An architect’s dream is an engineer’s nightmare.” A&E’s seeking to keep pace with lightning protection trends to help fortify their building dreams and nightmares, won’t want to miss an issue of  Build & Protect !
Lightning Protection Institute | Toll Free 800-488-6864 | Fax 660-582-0430 |

kiml@lightning.org | Website

Are Churches Attracting More Lightning Than Sinners? How protection SYSTEMS can prevent losses?

Steeple only grounding does not typically protect a structure from lightning, and single point or partial LPS do not comply with lightning protection safety Standards.There’s an old saying many lightning protection professionals are familiar with, that you may have heard it before, “Churches attract more lightning than sinners.”  While the saying is meant in jest, there is quite a bit of evidence that lightning causes a lot of headaches for churches–especially when we consider the fact that churches are spending millions of dollars each year on property damage due to lightning fires.

Fire is just part of the cost equation and doesn’t include damages caused by electrical surges that can disrupt and destroy wiring, computers, sound systems, alarm systems and electronics. Just last week, video from a security camera captured a massive lightning strike to a church in Ellijay, GA. The strike blew a hole in the church’s roof and sent an explosion of brick, wood and building debris into the early morning sky. A church spokesperson estimated that repairs to replace the damaged roof, and electrical equipment will cost at least $30,000 to restore. The video of the Ellijay church also helps illustrate three important concepts about lightning and lightning protection systems (LPS):

1) Lightning protection doesn’t attract lightning (the church steeple was equipped with a single lightning rod), but the lightning strike hit the roof at the opposite side of the structure.

2) Steeple only grounding doesn’t equate as a lightning protection system when it comes to protecting an entire structure.

3) Since lightning can and does (as shown in this video) strike objects outside of a “zone of protection,” steeple only grounding is not based on sound engineering principles or science. Engineers and building designers frequently refer to the rolling sphere method to determine where lightning protection components are required on a structure. (Zone of protection is explained in the NFPA 780 Standard for the Installation of Lightning Protection Systems and the rolling sphere method has been illustrated as a graphic.)

The above points help emphasize that steeple only grounding does not typically protect an entire structure, which is why partial LPS methods do not comply with NFPA 780. In fact, many experts warn that installation of partial lightning protection, designed to ground a steeple, cupola or weathervane, could be more dangerous than providing no protection at all. A single path to ground is not adequate to conduct the current involved with a lightning discharge. When lightning strikes a partial “system” (such as a grounded cupola, steeple or single point mast), side-flash to other conductive components on or in a structure can also occur. This side-flashing can damage building wiring, computer systems and electronics and even ignite fires. There’s no safe way to provide proper grounding from a punch that can pack up to 300 million volts of electricity and 30,000 amps–which is why all elements (strike termination devices, down conductors, bonding, grounding and surge protection) are essential for complete and effective LPS.

Reasons why churches are specifying lightning protection now more than ever before include:

• Insurers now require higher levels of safety for public venues such as churches, which often includes the installation of a LPS.

• Studies from the American Geophysical Union confirm that conventional lightning protection systems, in accordance with NFPA 780 Safety Standard, are highly effective in reducing lightning-caused fires and electrical surge damage to churches.

• Lightning protection systems do not attract lightning, but simply provide a preferred path of low resistance to dissipate lightning’s electricity.

• Lightning is a leading cause of church fires; estimated as responsible for 30% of such fires in the U.S.

• Lightning protection systems direct lightning’s harmful current to ground, instead of traveling through the building’s plumbing or electrical systems.

So when in doubt about LPS, a trained, LPI-certified lightning specialist is your best point of reference to ensure that your installation includes all components necessary to protect your facility.

The Lightning Protection Institute (LPI) conducts numerous educational, promotional and quality oriented programs on lightning protection and lightning safety and is the leading resource for lightning protection information and system requirements. Visit the LPI website or download a copy of LPI’s brochure to learn more about LPS for churches and houses of worship. 

Join LPI and the CE Academy for an Enlightening Day of Continuing Education and Networking in a City Near You!

Looking to learn more about LPS Continuing Education in a Lunch & Learn setting? The LPI is partnering with the Lightning Safety Alliance (LSA) and the CE Academy to bring the Lightning Protection 101 (LSA 101) course to your doorstep!

ce academy

In each one day event, the CE Academy provides 4-8 hours of AIA-registered CE courses, including breakfast and lunch! For your convenience, the CE Academy also issues certificates of completion and reports AIA credits for every event. The LSA 101 Lightning Protection session is a one-hour course which includes a review of proper lightning protection system design and application as conforming with NFPA and UL lightning protection requirements.  LSA 101 participants receive (1) AIA HSW /LU credit.

The CE Academy has scheduled the following upcoming LSA 101 sessions:
March 28, 2017  –  Louisville, KY
April 18, 2017  –  Detroit, MI
May 9, 2017  –  New Haven, CT
May 11, 2017  –  Boston, MA
August 3, 2017  –  Cleveland, OH
September 11, 2017  –  Orlando, FL
September 21, 2017  –  Calgary, CA
October 10, 2017  –  Chicago, IL
October 19, 2017  –  Jacksonville, FL
November 16, 2017  –  Boston, MA
December 5, 2017  –  Dallas, TX
December 12, 2017  –  Austin, TX

LSA 101 providers have have extensive knowledge of lightning protection methods and are actively involved in the lightning protection industry and its trade associations. Learning Objectives of the LSA 101 course include:

  1. Participants will gain a general understanding of how lightning protection systems work including the five essential elements of effective lightning protection systems.
  2. At the end of the program participants will be aware of the considerations that should be made during project planning to specify effective, attractive and low-maintenance lightning protection systems for all types of structures.
  3. Provide project planners with a general understanding of lightning protection systems.
  4. Make planners aware of the five (5) essential elements of a lightning protection system.
  5. Identify the areas planners should consider when specifying lightning protection systems.
 Discounts are available for early registration, so visit the CE Academy website today for information about events, fees and program agendas.  For more information about the LSA 101 program, visit the Lightning Safety Alliance.